The Yellow Wallpaper - A Stylistic Analysis

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The concept of "The New Woman," for example, began to circulate in the s—s as women pushed for broader roles outside their home-roles that could draw on women's intelligence and non-domestic skills and talents. Gilman advocated revised roles for women, whom, Gilman believed, should be on much more equal economic, social, and political footing with men.

In her famous work of nonfiction Women and Economics , Gilman argued that women should strive-and be able-to work outside the home. Gilman also believed that women should be financially independent from men, and she promoted the then-radical idea that men and women even should share domestic work. First appearing in the New England Magazine in January , "The Yellow Wall-paper," according to many literary critics, is a narrative study of Gilman's own depression and "nervousness.

Weir Mitchell. Mitchell prescribed his famous "rest cure," which restricted women from anything that labored and taxed their minds e. More than just a psychological study of postpartum depression, Gilman's "The Yellow Wall-paper" offers a compelling study of Gilman's own feminism and of roles for women in the s and s. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text e. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Skip to main content. Lesson Plan. Photo caption. Lesson Plan Details Background. For background information relevant to this lesson, see Lesson One , which leads students to explore the social contexts of the late 19th and early 20th century relevant to Gilman's story.

Activity 1. The chart helps students take notes on the story, highlighting characters, setting, narrative style, point-of-view, and potential symbols. If students explored the contextual material for the story in Lesson One , each small group should have presented its findings. With this context in mind, begin a class discussion on the following general question, "What does Charlotte Perkins Gilman's story "The Yellow Wall-paper" suggest about a middle-class woman's place and role s in society in the mid- to late-nineteenth century?

Students should explore how the story is told the form and how this influences the manner in which we perceive the main character and her situation. In the course of your discussion about the form, content, and context of the story, discuss the following passages [sections correspond to University of Virginia online version]. During the course of the discussion, students should draw on their notes from their Active Reading Worksheet.

Section 1 , "It is very seldom that mere ordinary people like John and myself secure ancestral halls for the summer.

Wall Decor

A colonial mansion, a hereditary estate, I would say a haunted house, and reach the height of romantic felicity but that would be asking too much of fate! How and why is the setting significant? Section 1 , "John is a physician, and—perhaps— I would not say it to a living soul, of course, but this is dead paper and a great relief to my mind —perhaps that is one reason I do not get well faster. What is the narrator's style of writing? What is her tone? Section 1 , "Personally, I believe that congenial work, with excitement and change, would do me good.

How does this contrast with what her husband and brother say? Ask students to cite additional passages from their active reading notes. How does Gilman's vision of work compare to the roles of the mother in the "Light of the Home" image and the representation of "keeping house" in the "I Can't Keep House Without It" advertisement? Section 1, "There comes John, and I must put this away-he hates to have me write a word.

What is the effect of this journal style narrative in developing the main character? How does it influence how the reader understands the main character? Section 2 , "Nobody would believe what an effort it is to do what little I am able, -to dress and entertain, and order things. It is fortunate Mary is so good with the baby. Such a dear baby!


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And yet I cannot be with him, it makes me so nervous. I suppose John never was nervous in his life. He laughs at me so about this wall-paper!

Deconstructive Analysis: The Yellow Wall Paper

At first he meant to repaper the room, but afterwards he said that I was letting it get the better of me, and that nothing was worse for a nervous patient than to give way to such fancies. He said that after the wall-paper was changed it would be the heavy bedstead, and then the barred windows, and then that gate at the head of the stairs, and so on.

A Stylistic Analysis

But he is right enough about the beds and windows and things. It is an airy and comfortable room as any one need wish, and, of course, I would not be so silly as to make him uncomfortable just for a whim. Photo caption. Lesson Plan Details Background. For background information relevant to this lesson, see Lesson One , which leads students to explore the social contexts of the late 19th and early 20th century relevant to Gilman's story. Activity 1.

The chart helps students take notes on the story, highlighting characters, setting, narrative style, point-of-view, and potential symbols. If students explored the contextual material for the story in Lesson One , each small group should have presented its findings. With this context in mind, begin a class discussion on the following general question, "What does Charlotte Perkins Gilman's story "The Yellow Wall-paper" suggest about a middle-class woman's place and role s in society in the mid- to late-nineteenth century? Students should explore how the story is told the form and how this influences the manner in which we perceive the main character and her situation.

In the course of your discussion about the form, content, and context of the story, discuss the following passages [sections correspond to University of Virginia online version].


  • The Yellow Wallpaper.
  • Empty Eyes (Quickreads Book 1).
  • Deconstructive Analysis: The Yellow Wall Paper?
  • Lenergia pulita (Farsi unidea) (Italian Edition)?
  • During the course of the discussion, students should draw on their notes from their Active Reading Worksheet. Section 1 , "It is very seldom that mere ordinary people like John and myself secure ancestral halls for the summer. A colonial mansion, a hereditary estate, I would say a haunted house, and reach the height of romantic felicity but that would be asking too much of fate! How and why is the setting significant? Section 1 , "John is a physician, and—perhaps— I would not say it to a living soul, of course, but this is dead paper and a great relief to my mind —perhaps that is one reason I do not get well faster.

    What is the narrator's style of writing? What is her tone? Section 1 , "Personally, I believe that congenial work, with excitement and change, would do me good. How does this contrast with what her husband and brother say? Ask students to cite additional passages from their active reading notes. How does Gilman's vision of work compare to the roles of the mother in the "Light of the Home" image and the representation of "keeping house" in the "I Can't Keep House Without It" advertisement?

    Section 1, "There comes John, and I must put this away-he hates to have me write a word.

    Literary Devices in The Yellow Wallpaper - Owl Eyes

    What is the effect of this journal style narrative in developing the main character? How does it influence how the reader understands the main character? Section 2 , "Nobody would believe what an effort it is to do what little I am able, -to dress and entertain, and order things. It is fortunate Mary is so good with the baby.

    Such a dear baby! And yet I cannot be with him, it makes me so nervous. I suppose John never was nervous in his life. He laughs at me so about this wall-paper!

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